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Mangwana Rubbishes ZACC Reports Of Zim Losing US$7b Through Corruption

10 October 2020

The Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Information, Publicity and Broadcasting Services, Nick Mangwana has dismissed claims by the Zimbabwe Anti Corruption Commission (ZACC) that Zimbabwe has lost approximately US$7 billion through corruption.

Mangwana did not give the correct figure which the country has lost but claimed that $7 billion was an exaggeration.

He was responding to a tweet by advocate Fadzayi Mahere, the national spokesperson of the opposition MDC Alliance who had insinuated that the administration led by President Emmerson Mnangagwa is not heartily fighting corruption.

Mahere, in response to Mangwana’s post which suggested that the abolition of corruption in local government authorities, most of them run by MDC Alliance, had posted:

The sordid corruption that has killed Zimbabwe is right at the top. Obadiah Moyo who looted Covid supplies walks free. Mupfumira who looted NSSA walks free. Over US$7bn was looted under Command Agriculture. Not to mention Drax & Covidgate. Where is ZACC? Zanu must stop looting.

Mangwana responded:

1-Obadiah Moyo and Prisca Mupfumira were fired and their matters are before the courts #Cleansing.

2-US$7 billion is just political hyperbole not underpinned by facts. That was proved in Parliament.

3-Govt of Zimbabwe did not lose a single cent in the Drax Corruption saga.

This comes after investigations by ZimLive and journalist Hopewell Chin’ono suggested that Zimbabwe could have lost over US$60 million in the Drax corruption saga.

Some have also said the way the corruption cases involving political elites in the country are being handled show the government’s lack of enthusiasm in dealing with the rot.

More: Nick Mangwana; Fadzayi Mahere

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